Bros: Been awhile since I got to type “well written”!

Bros, directed and co-written (with star Billy Eichner) by Nicholas Stoller is a novel and authentic take on gay relationships. Not only that, I believe it is the beginning of normalizing gay relationships. Perhaps a controversial take, but until more of these groundbreaking films are seen, society is going to have to deal with indgnant… Continue reading Bros: Been awhile since I got to type “well written”!

Blonde: NC 17 Could Actually Stand for No Consolation

Let’s just say Andrew Dominik has a dark side, no? Killing Them Softly, for one, and he also likes the based on a true story as in Chopper (and now possibly Blonde). Mind you, violence is not my style so I’ve seen neither of the aforementioned, but there were more triggers for me in Blonde… Continue reading Blonde: NC 17 Could Actually Stand for No Consolation

Back to Back Classics in SRQ: Two Johns and a Jimmy

What a gift to live in Sarasota! Thursday I saw Grease (Kleiser, 1978) on the big screen at the charming Burns Court Theater (Sarasota Film Society) where joy was expressed in the gyrating seat dances and applause after each song. Truly a blessing to listen to audience members share their love for Olivia Newton-JOHN and… Continue reading Back to Back Classics in SRQ: Two Johns and a Jimmy

Peter Von Kant: Raises Interesting Questions

First of all, where are my people? Come on world, or ok, I’ll go smaller, Sarasota. Ok, smaller still, Ringling College Film Majors? I’d really like to see more intellectual and artsy people at Burns Court. For Peter Von Kant, I had a small passionate few who stayed for the talk back who I really… Continue reading Peter Von Kant: Raises Interesting Questions

Scorsese’s Godard Pick: Contempt

I certainly was familiar with Jean-Luc Godard was, but upon seeing his recent death, knew I was deficient in experience. So when I saw Martin Scorsese loved Contempt, that was my ticket. Based on the Italian novel by the same name, Godard chose the buttocks bombshell Bridgette Bardot as the female lead. Here she plays… Continue reading Scorsese’s Godard Pick: Contempt

Jaws 3D Worth Taking a Bite!

Jaws 3 D is totally worth the price of admission and since I had literally not seen it since it’s debut (age 12), I was skeptical about how good it would be. Certainly 3D helped, but the acting performances by the three male leads stand the test of time. Scene 1: Roy Scheider (two time… Continue reading Jaws 3D Worth Taking a Bite!

In the Summer Movie Spouse Competition, Javier Wins

Penelope Cruz might be the prettier of the two, but Javier Bardem’s newest film The Good Boss is far better than Cruz’s Official Competition. Sorry Penny! And that’s saying something since I saw The Good Boss after a very long day: running 3 and a half miles, playing an hour and 15 minutes of tennis… Continue reading In the Summer Movie Spouse Competition, Javier Wins

Three Thousand Years of Longing Left Me Yearning for A.S. Byatt’s Story Depth

I’m not going to change, but it’s always dangerous to read the book before seeing the movie. But danger in a marvelous way, since our brains are able to picture who we’d cast as actresses and actors, what hotel rooms we envision, etc… So with that being said, while I enjoyed the movie, it did… Continue reading Three Thousand Years of Longing Left Me Yearning for A.S. Byatt’s Story Depth

“Monday” on Showtime: You know what K.C. sang “Rainy days and Mondays”…well switch out Crazy for rainy

Surely I’m not the only one who justifies her/his staying in and saving money by this self-shaming scold; You subscribe to two streaming services, find something at home to watch. So my thriftiness led me to “Monday” released in 2021. Once I’m done posting this, I’ll be reading the other human who saw this, John… Continue reading “Monday” on Showtime: You know what K.C. sang “Rainy days and Mondays”…well switch out Crazy for rainy

Vengeance: BJ Novak’s Dance is the Texas Too-Smart

I enjoyed Vengeance, written and directed by BJ Novak, but also felt agitated. Based on his cartwheels of Mensa-like dialogue, his Harvard diploma is apparent. And that’s the problem with Vengeance, its a little too full of itself, a proverbial Texas Too-Smart. Ideas I enjoyed: that modern Americans are selfish, wanting it all. The fresh… Continue reading Vengeance: BJ Novak’s Dance is the Texas Too-Smart

Leftovers Two Days Straight

I went to see my second viewing of Top Gun Maverick and Where the Crawdads Sing on back to back nights and wanted to comment on both. First, Top Gun Maverick. I felt like I was more ‘present’ for this viewing which can sometimes happen the second time around. Whereas I originally claimed that the… Continue reading Leftovers Two Days Straight

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Where the Crawdads Sing: the summer of grumpy critics

Post Script Preface: Email me with comments at irun2eatpizza@hotmail.com I’ve tried for many moons to use the “I’m a Human Capctha with zero success (call me a techno-dunce), HENCE, my email works! I’m upping my score to a 70% after thinking of the adorable little girl who plays the young Kya, Jojo Regina. Kids are… Continue reading Where the Crawdads Sing: the summer of grumpy critics

The Souvenir: Part II; My Kind of Paint Drying

The Souvenir Part 2 was as equally mystifying yet engrossing as the first film by Joanna Hog. Precautions: Don’t even try it though if you haven’t seen the first one as you won’t know what the heck is happening. If you have any a.d.d. tendencies, either take a Valium or wait until you happen to… Continue reading The Souvenir: Part II; My Kind of Paint Drying

Official Competition: Dark Humor Warm Up Required

I wasn’t prepared for Argentinian humor Friday night when I watched Official Competition. I was just complacent and over tired, but mesmerized by Penelope Cruz looking great even in a frizzy red wig…how does one woman possess such beauty? That’s the main question. I have heard many film buffs say what a genius performance she… Continue reading Official Competition: Dark Humor Warm Up Required

What is a Woman Documentary: Can We Let Kids be Kids?

Here’s the bottom line on Matt Walsh’s What is a Woman? First, let me get my traffic cop whistle. And I earned my whistle gaining a Masters Degree in Counseling from SUNY Brockport. BLURRRR (that’s a whistle sound): You, Matt Walsh, you don’t need to be smarmy when asking questions to adults. BLURRRR: And at… Continue reading What is a Woman Documentary: Can We Let Kids be Kids?

Two Reviews: A Duffer and a Fluffer

The Duffer: While Mark Rylance was fantastically humble as the duffer Maurice Flitcroft in The Phantom of the Open, the actor/actress who stole the show is Sally Hawkins. Nominated twice for Oscars, she may be the most underated actress in the world. Watch Eternal Beauty (also directed by Craig Roberts who did this Phantom film),… Continue reading Two Reviews: A Duffer and a Fluffer

Cha Cha Real Smooth: Memories and Possibilities

Cha Cha Real Smooth not only showcases evolutionary talent and a new phenom, but brings those forces together to an alchemist fever pitch. Cooper Raiff, the aforementioned wunderkind also wrote and directed this emotionally moving gem. Dakota Johnson (who I have loved since Peanut Butter Falcon) shines as the outwardly chill, but inwardly restless single… Continue reading Cha Cha Real Smooth: Memories and Possibilities

Nothing But Net: Hustle

Some body besides the Independent Spirit Award Committee (though God Bless Your souls) please recognize what PT Anderson saw TWO DECADES AGO (Hello?) in Punch Drunk Love: Adam Sandler is a legitimate dramatic actor. I promise not to gush too much about who I feel are cinematic masters (Safdie Brothers), since Hustle is still no… Continue reading Nothing But Net: Hustle

Mr. Marshall, I’ll Be Frank. And Ryan, I’m the One Suffern

Ideally a music documentary leaves you uplifted and wanting to travel, whether that be back in time (Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President) or to see current performers (Shine the Light). Jazz Fest: A New Orleans Story did neither and was, quite frankly, horrible. Frank Marshall and Ryan Suffern should have hired a writer with… Continue reading Mr. Marshall, I’ll Be Frank. And Ryan, I’m the One Suffern

Can I Hug a Movie? Sure, why not! Our Souls at Night

Our Souls at Night is a gorgeously written movie about human relationships. But first, let me tell you how I got there. I wanted to be ‘on trend’ so thought I’d watch a couple of segments of Love, Sex & Robots on Netflix. I mean, who can knock the title? In my head I thought,… Continue reading Can I Hug a Movie? Sure, why not! Our Souls at Night

Need For Speed and Splenda: Top Gun Maverick

I thoroughly bought in by the second half of Top Gun Maverick (directed by Joseph Kosinski), the long postponed follow-up to the 1980’s machismo cult favorite. The dramatic pauses made me giggle a bit in the first half as did the intensely serious military explanations. But not a big deal, simply like jumping into a… Continue reading Need For Speed and Splenda: Top Gun Maverick

Anais in Love: An Arc de Goodenumph

France may as well be Mars to me. They’re such odd people. They are so rushed, emphatic and impatitent as evidenced by the character Anais (portrayed by Anais Demoustier…coincidence?) in Anais in Love, written and directed by Charline Bourgeois-Tacquet. Eerily similar in plot to The Worst Person in the World, Anais in Love is a… Continue reading Anais in Love: An Arc de Goodenumph

Jumpin Jake Flash, Bay’s Ambulance, a Gas Gas Gas

If only I could get paid for this, I’d be a wealthy woman…Now that I’m back to my normal Buddhist zero expectations, I had fun watching Michael Bay’s smash up extravaganza. Credit goes to Chris Fedak who adapted the screenplay from the Dutch original, who either added or maintained the perfect balance of melodrama with… Continue reading Jumpin Jake Flash, Bay’s Ambulance, a Gas Gas Gas

Worthy Story, Too Much Fighting, All at Once

Everything Everywhere All at Once is by the writer and director team of Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinhert (Swiss Army Man, weird flick). I had the misfortune of hearing too many hyperbolic compliments beforehand, setting it up for the inability to live up to great expectations. First, great premise: the world is f’ed up (of… Continue reading Worthy Story, Too Much Fighting, All at Once

Mothering Sunday: Stop the Presses

Preface: A quote from Sheila Heti’s book Pure Colour which sums up the special quality of relationships falling on the cusp, fitting my experience with the movie Mothering Sunday: “Sometimes a person is meant to move forward in the world with the one they love at a distance, and that the distance is there to… Continue reading Mothering Sunday: Stop the Presses

Montana Story; acting as majestic as the mountains

a brother-sister dynamics film

Scott McGehee and David Siegel (of What Masie Knew, another jewel of a film) have come up with another compelling family story adaptation (Mike Spreter the original author), this time centering on a brother-sister dynamic. Showing now at the Sarasota Film Festival, the film is definitely worth seeing (and if I could fit it in,… Continue reading Montana Story; acting as majestic as the mountains

Compartment No. 6, Don’t Passover the Little Guy/Girl

Winning three awards at Cannes, directed and adapted from a novel to the screen by Juho Kuomanen, Compartment No. 6 is not a film at which to sneeze, yet because it didn’t make the U.S. Slap Fest, most people probably pass it by. But foreign films are often deeper than American (sorry USA) and Compartment… Continue reading Compartment No. 6, Don’t Passover the Little Guy/Girl

Sarasota Film Fest Documentary: Oleg, an Editing Feat

“Oleg, The Oleg Vidov Story” is an editing feat. As a documentary told in chronological story, no matter how exciting the events, a writer (in this case, Cory Taylor) and director (Nadia Tass) have to spice it up with timely clips that put us in the subject’s milieu. And Oleg does this in a fascinating… Continue reading Sarasota Film Fest Documentary: Oleg, an Editing Feat

A sweet giggle followed by a cannonball into Deep Water

I loved Deep Water. Think the whimsy can be attributed to the thrills and absurdity of real life, and how Deep Water addresses the idea of men who refuse to leave abusive relationships (the subject of a stage play I wrote two years ago called “May Divorce Be With You”–think Star Wars and you get… Continue reading A sweet giggle followed by a cannonball into Deep Water

After Yang Screams for the Big Screen & Voila! SFF Answers the Call

Second viewing of after Yang at the Sarasota Film Festival….ruminations: I wanted to shout out to the man in charge of the music Aska Matsumyia. The delicate piano helps to accentuate the grief and loss. And thank goodness I saw it on the big screen. There’s a moment I did not catch, so precious that… Continue reading After Yang Screams for the Big Screen & Voila! SFF Answers the Call

“The Outfit” Comes Off a Little Too Easily

Graham Moore, Oscar winner for Best Adapted Screenplay for the very moving The Imitation Game, co-wrote and directed The Outfit, out now at Burns Court and AMC Bradenton. And while I love Mark Rylance (I could have kissed him for making me laugh so hard in “Don’t Look Up”), this film was just a little… Continue reading “The Outfit” Comes Off a Little Too Easily

I took in The Worst Person in the World a second time and found it even more charming

I took in The Worst Person in the World again (which coincidentally is also something I did literally from 1999 to 2006 #noregrets). The second time around gleaned these thoughts: a. The soundtrack is truly essential and amazing. And I had not realized “Waters of March” was done by Art Garfunkel. b. Andersen Danielsen Lie… Continue reading I took in The Worst Person in the World a second time and found it even more charming

Flee, Moving and Commendable

Immigration seems to be the new school shootings, meaning, most have heard so many stories, both news and renditions (American Dirt and Dreamers just to name one) that to make a documentary about the topic is risky due to public news fatigue. CLARIFICATION: to me, both topics are still VERY important and relevant. Further proof… Continue reading Flee, Moving and Commendable

I Found “A Hero”, Asghar Farhadi Award Worthiest

I didn’t sleep well last night, but the movie viewing of A Hero was worth the sleep deprivation. While I’m sure this weakness is not solely Sagittarius, I especially related to the movie’s main theme of no good deed goes unpunished. As demonstrated recently in “Red Rocket”, an emotionally engrossing movie always provokes me into… Continue reading I Found “A Hero”, Asghar Farhadi Award Worthiest

Parallel Mothers, Still on My Mission

Pedro Almodovar wrote and directed Parallel Mothers, a film I liked less than 2019’s Pain and Glory, but again, much like Drive My Car, I admit to cultural ignorance. First, I’m pro-cremation, so any story line about angst about family bodies being buried next to each other, does not tug my heart strings, disculpe. I… Continue reading Parallel Mothers, Still on My Mission

The Power of the Dog, Worthy of a Re-Watch

For my initial watch of The Power of the Dog, [and I truly want a re-watch as this movie has some hidden gem moments that hit you out of nowhere and are gone to quickly to be appreciated just once (the post wedding waltz, the Bronco Bill handkerchief scene, the smoking of the same cigarette… Continue reading The Power of the Dog, Worthy of a Re-Watch

The Lost Daughter, A Slippery Slope

I loved the book The Lost Daughter, as Elena Ferrante’s character wrestled with her wanderlust, her desire to excel professionally and experience midlife hedonism. But the movie? Not so much. The harsh visual reality of exasperated mothers who simply induce more needy children was deeply affecting, but in a depressing way. Adapted to screenplay and… Continue reading The Lost Daughter, A Slippery Slope

CODA, the Peanut Butter Falcon of 2021

My top ten is changing after seeing CODA last night. Goodbye West Side Story and hello CODA. Sian Heder’s written and directed movie (taken from the original French idea and version by Victoria Bedos’ The Belier Family) about the hearing daughter of a deaf family had me in tears several times. I haven’t been this… Continue reading CODA, the Peanut Butter Falcon of 2021

Stephen is the Root-y in The Tragedy of MacBeth

While The Tragedy of MacBeth’s sound and cinematography are outstanding, along with OF COURSE, Denzel as a vision to behold and his flawless recitation of Shakespeare solidifies his G.O.A.T. status, in addition to an opposite but equally impressive way, as Frances takes her “I woke up like this” simplicity look and spins it into acting… Continue reading Stephen is the Root-y in The Tragedy of MacBeth

Red Rocket made me scream out loud, literally

Hopefully you’re savvy enough to get my review title’s double entendre which really did happen. I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve said something out loud in a theater. The last time was during The Lighthouse when Willem DaFoe gave such a powerful monologue that I whisper said, “Oh my God”… Continue reading Red Rocket made me scream out loud, literally

Great Case Study, Good Starter Film: The Novice

The Novice, written and directed by Lauren Hadaway, reminds me of my counseling training days. If you suped up a OCD case study from the DSM-IV, you’d have The Novice. Unfortunately, case studies are just one note wonders, they don’t round out the person’s life, nor specifically detail impacts on a person’s life. It’s simply… Continue reading Great Case Study, Good Starter Film: The Novice

Don’t Look Up But Get Down with Your Sense of Humor

Don’t Look Up written (with the help of David Sirota: Guardian Contributor Bernie’s Speech Writer 2020) and directed by Adam McKay consists of a more star studded cast than can be held in the sky reported on by scientists Leo DeCaprio and Jen Lawrence. You name him/her/they and they are also in the movie: Streep,… Continue reading Don’t Look Up But Get Down with Your Sense of Humor

Licorice Pizza: Not Sugar Free, but the Diabetes is worth it

Licorice Pizza won’t ever be my favorite PT Anderson movie, but it was dog gone enjoyable. Call me all American, since what I like about Licorice Pizza is exactly what I didn’t like about Belfast. In the end, L.P. consists of gorgeous moments strung delicately together, like shiny romantic white lights in a dark room.… Continue reading Licorice Pizza: Not Sugar Free, but the Diabetes is worth it

Chemistry Counts: Guillermo No, Steven, Yes Sir!

(Write to me your comments and opinions at irun2eatpizza@hotmail.com) I did something I rarely do Friday when I chose walking out of Nightmare Alley over hari kari (now the latter would have been a carnival side show!). Just depression with all caps with zero chemistry between Mara and Cooper, as well as zippo for Cooper… Continue reading Chemistry Counts: Guillermo No, Steven, Yes Sir!

Feelings and Honesty: C’mon C’mon

C’mon C’mon written and directed by Mike Mills is a film everyone should see, but probably won’t. This is VERY UNFORTUNATE, given that Burt Bacharach and Hal David’s 1965 song, ‘what the world needs now is love sweet love, it’s the only thing that there’s just too little of” is still very relevant. Especially for… Continue reading Feelings and Honesty: C’mon C’mon

A Knockoff: House of Gucci

If you came out to my TALK BACK at Burns Court, THANK YOU. Comments won’t work on this blog site, but please email me at irun2eatpizza@hotmail.com with any comments on the movie, what you’d like to see in future talk backs, anything!! Yo Ridley, yes you, Mr Scott, Com’ere. And you, Becky Johnston, well, you… Continue reading A Knockoff: House of Gucci

Belfast; Rotten Potatoes, Heavy with Famine

Well, I can’t tell you why I don’t like Belfast that much because then I’d break my spoiler promise. Hence, I’ll give you some hints, and once you see it, please, by all means, write to me at irun2eatpizza@hotmail.com to guess the answer, or to agree or disagree with my premise. Let’s just say it… Continue reading Belfast; Rotten Potatoes, Heavy with Famine

Just one tiny tick too many…tick, tick Boom!

My favorite musical of all time is Rent, so I confess my bias upfront. For those of you not in the know, tick tick Boom is a both a musical by and basically a mini biopic of Jonathan Larson. My second favorite musical is Hamilton, so I obviously had a good feeling about tick tick… Continue reading Just one tiny tick too many…tick, tick Boom!

Spencer: First Choice for Re-watch

For those who grew up in a dysfunctional household where holidays were not quite ‘the most wonderful time of the year’, Spencer will feel like a walk down memory lane…And while some might choose The French Dispatch for best 2021 re-watch (and I’m game, genius creativity at too high rpms), given the choice I’d say… Continue reading Spencer: First Choice for Re-watch

French Dispatch, Just Ca Va

Wes Anderson’s French Dispatch reminds me of me when I’m trying to tell a long story or joke, I talk way too fast, lacking confidence or worried that the person’s listening is bored. So Wes, get thee to a therapist. You’re an artist, but you have to slow down the pace so we can enjoy… Continue reading French Dispatch, Just Ca Va

Dune: This Isn’t Quick Sand, It’s DEEP!

This may be a one time anomaly, when cinematography, sound, and acting override a basic story that’s been done (Star Wars) and done (Gladiator) and done (Avatar). But Dune, directed and written by Denis Villeneuve (who worked on Arrival, Sicario and Prisoners) with co-writers Joe Spaights and Eric Roth (Forrest Gump, Mank, Star is Born)… Continue reading Dune: This Isn’t Quick Sand, It’s DEEP!

Four, if Not Five, Movies in One: Bergman Island

Hey! Write to me at irun2eatpizza@hotmail.com since I can’t seem to work out the bugs of my comment section. I’ll write back and would love to hear your views! Bergman Island made my city of five years seem new again. I practically skipped home. Here’s why: Mia Hansen-Love’s film is basically five films in one… Continue reading Four, if Not Five, Movies in One: Bergman Island

Germans and Women win the weekend film contest: No Time To Cry

Sorry Cary Joji Fukunaga, Maria Schrader beat you in the writing and directing departments this weekend. In fact, let me count the ways… 1. Sex appeal: though the lead character of “I’m Your Man” (Maria Schrader’s film) wears librarian fashions, there is an actual passionate sex scene. Whereas James Bond, with the emotional range of… Continue reading Germans and Women win the weekend film contest: No Time To Cry

Azor: A Creeper with a Calendar

Thank goodness for the calendar in Azor, otherwise I would have not quite understood the full length of Andreas Fontana’s new drama. Let me help you out: the movie is based on 1980 when the government had essentially been overthrown and a period known as The National Reorganization Process took over in the form of… Continue reading Azor: A Creeper with a Calendar

A “Pig”‘s Pulchritude

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and the adage applies to not only a person’s love for their pet as in Nicolas Cage’s syncopation with his truffle pig, but also my adoration for Cage’s acting career. Sure, his choices haven’t been ‘pretty’ at times, yet when he delivers a performance such as Pig… Continue reading A “Pig”‘s Pulchritude

Three Summers, Like a Tres Leches Cake, Tres Veroes

Pardon my bad Spanish analogy, but since I love Tres Leches cake, I thought I’d compare Tres Veroes, a fine movie written and directed by Sandra Kogut. First the perfect three part structure: Decembers of 2015, 2016, and 2017. 2015 begins with Mada, played brilliantly by Regina Case, as housekeeper/family caretaker to a wealthy Brazilian… Continue reading Three Summers, Like a Tres Leches Cake, Tres Veroes

God’s Own Country, a must see

Recently I was asked to co-host a program at our local Independent Theater Burns Court for the movie “Ammonite” which debuts November 13th. As a dutiful life long learner, I looked into the writer/director Francis Lee. Lo and behold, was a movie on his filmography I’d been meaning to watch starring one of my favorite… Continue reading God’s Own Country, a must see

A Girl Walks Into a Movie Theater…

A girl walks into a movie theater, intent on seeing Little Women, but just as I veer towards the men’s group at any Super Bowl party, the minute I heard a woman say how Little Women dripped a little too much maudlin, I spun and drove for a power lay up back into Uncut Gems.… Continue reading A Girl Walks Into a Movie Theater…

Uncut Gems: Sparkling!

Not sure how to write a review about a revelation without spoiling this film written by my cherished Safdie brothers (Good Time, Daddy Long Legs) and their writing partner Ronald Bronstein. BUT I will keep my promise!! Suffice to say it’s a must see and certainly breaks into my top ten at ‘lucky’ number 7… Continue reading Uncut Gems: Sparkling!

Sweetest Peanut Butter I’ve Ever Known

Hyperbole, schmyperbole, I’m jumping on The Peanut Butter Falcon Oscar bandwagon ready to throw non-breakables at the television should it not win several awards. Best Original Screenplay: Tyler Nilson and Mike Schwartz are the new Affleck/Damon, great storytelling and not a second of filler in the entire movie. My movie companion was dying to get… Continue reading Sweetest Peanut Butter I’ve Ever Known

Under the Learn Something New Everyday Column: Vernon, Florida

Researching for the film enthusiasm class I’ll be leading through OLLI (via Ringling School of Art) in January entitled Flamboyant Florida Films, I decided to choose a couple of docs. An older one a work colleague suggested is Vernon, Florida from director Errol Morris. Well, have I learned something new! First, Morris is an Academy… Continue reading Under the Learn Something New Everyday Column: Vernon, Florida